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OFF THE PREMISES HANDBOOK

ISBN: 9781905538522
£99.00
Product description

Introduction
Need help with planning and executing school trips? The Off the Premises Handbook will help you to run well-planned, efficiently managed, and interesting school trips, as well as helping you to assess and control their safety.

Taking your students out of school and off the premises for carefully selected and suitable purposes is good for their learning. A steadily growing body of research and practice shows that there are short-, medium- and long-term benefits to students from such experiences, whatever the subject or activity.

Being off the school premises can at times seem to be fraught with difficulties and danger. However, the benefits of offsite learning, be they visits to the theatre, art gallery, religious building, farm, field centre, factory or another country, make the efforts educationally worthwhile. If visits, events and ventures are well-planned and managed, with adult support that is well trained and informed, then unanticipated and unforeseen problems are minimised.

Benefits
What the Off the Premises Handbook can do for you:

provide comprehensive guidance on planning, implementing and evaluating every stage of your school visit
help you identify and remove barriers to taking learning off-site
relate off-site learning to your school’s self-evaluation form (SEF)
save time and effort by providing templates for letters, forms and checklists
provide case studies of best-practice
ensure you are confident and capable in carrying out risk assessments
help you to budget for your trip
help you to brief parents.
Summary of contents
The Off the Premises Handbook is a comprehensive and practical resource to ensure you have the confidence to plan, prepare, implement and evaluate off-site visits which will support learning and enrich your relationships with students – with the full support of national, local and school policies.
Taking your students out of school and off the premises for carefully selected and suitable purposes is good for their learning. A steadily growing body of research and practice shows that there are short-, medium- and long-term benefits to students from such experiences, whatever the subject or activity.

Being off the school premises can at times seem to be fraught with difficulties and danger. However, the benefits of offsite learning, be they visits to the theatre, art gallery, religious building, farm, field centre, factory or another country, make the efforts educationally worthwhile. If visits, events and ventures are well-planned and managed, with adult support that is well trained and informed, then unanticipated and unforeseen problems are minimised.

How to use this resource

The Off the Premises Handbook is an invaluable publication that is both comprehensive and practical. It is intended as a resource to be dipped into for topics that specifically concern the reader. It is a reference book – not something to be read from start to finish — although if you are new to taking students out of school, a straight read-through will highlight all the pertinent issues.



CD-Rom templates included

The CD-Rom templates can be used as a shortcut to create a new letter, list or communication each time there is a visit planned. They are adaptable to changing circumstances. There are also comprehensive checklists to ensure that you don’t overlook anything in your planning and preparation.
As well as a general reference, this publication can be used effectively as a resource for in-service training within a school and as part of a departmental, key stage or individual’s professional development programme.

It is aimed at headteachers, deputies, educational visit coordinators and teachers in primary and secondary schools in England and Wales.
The main body of the handbook takes you through the process of organising a school visit – the principles of which are generic to any situation where you are taking students off the premises. A variety of templates and case studies are included in the handbook to help you identify the educational objectives of the visit, send letters to parents and write kit lists and other checklists. These and many others are included on the CD so that they can be saved onto your own computer and personalised for your school as necessary.

Chapter breakdown
Introduction

1. Why go off the premises?
Why it is so important for learning to go off the premises
How learning outside the classroom can boost achievement and enhance personal development
Overcoming barriers to leaving the classroom
Policy frameworks that support learning off the premises
Learning Outside the Classroom Quality Badge

2. Overcoming barriers
Time
Cost
Fears about health and safety or about teachers facing legal action
Bureaucracy
Low awareness of benefits and opportunities available
Training for teachers
Transport
Worries about poor behaviour of students on visits
Logistical difficulties
Inclusion
Adequate staffing

3. Embedding learning objectives when off-site
Planning an off-site learning activity
Using effective learning strategies outside the classroom
Applying pedagogy and practice from the Secondary National Strategy
Enhancing the Every Child Matters agenda
Subject-specific learning objectives
Key Stage 3
The 14-19 curriculum

4. Initial planning
Defining the aims, objectives and purpose of the visit
Which students will take part in the visit?
Who is the visit leader?
What is the location of the visit?
Quality badges
Sustainability
When will the visit take place?
Costs
Getting permission
Categories of risk
Assessing support from parents and carers

5. Inclusion of disabled students
Education and disability discrimination
How is discrimination defined under the law?
Less favourable treatment
Failing to make a reasonable adjustment
Justification for failing to take ‘reasonable steps’
What is a ‘substantial disadvantage’?
What is ‘reasonable’?
When do schools and colleges need to take action on reasonable adjustments?
Who is the responsible body?
Auxiliary aids and services
Do schools need to make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to buildings and physical environment under Part 4 of DDA?
Who is disabled?
How many pupils count as disabled?
How is this different from special educational needs?
What parents can do if they think their child has been discriminated against
Other duties under the DDA
Implementing the ‘reasonable adjustment’ duty
Examples of good practice in making reasonable adjustments for educational visits
The Duty to Promote Disability Equality
Implications of the Duty to Promote Disability Equality for educational visits
Disability Equality and educational visits and activities off the premises
Conclusion

6. Detailed planning and organisation
Background information
Make a preliminary site visit
Take local and expert advice
Make yourself aware of local codes and practices
Using a centre or external provider
Bookings and contracts
Risk management
Make alternative plans
Finance
Charging
Costs of accompanying teachers
Managing funds
VAT
Transport
Using public transport
Using hired buses and coaches
Using a minibus or private car
Insurance
Areas of cover
Employer’s liability
Insurance and volunteers
Insurance from professional associations
Insurance for overseas visits
Informing others about insurance arrangements

7. Preparation and final arrangements
Communicating with parents and obtaining consent
Regular, local activities
Day visits
Residential visits and visits abroad
Consent forms
Parents’ meeting
Following return of consent forms
Programme planning
Planning the visit in detail
Making contingency plans
Roles and responsibilities
Respect for the environment you are visiting
General routines
Behaviour and staying safe
Equipment to take
Organising work for those not coming on the visit

8. Health, safety and risk assessment
Duty of care
Assessing staff competence
Competent visit leaders
Staff training
Volunteers
CRB checks for volunteers
Ensuring safe conduct of volunteers
Giving volunteers extra responsibilities
Using an external provider
Using a provider for adventurous activities
Safety and risk
Hazards and risk
Behaviour problems, illness or injury
Dangerous behaviour
Remote supervision
Using a buddy system
Hazards on different types of visit
Transport
Key issues
Supervision while travelling
Students’ behaviour
Swimming
Farm visits
First aid kits
Emergency procedures
Missing people
Abuse
Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences

9. Doing the visit
Before you set off
The day before the visit
On the morning of the visit
On arrival
Before starting any activities
During the visit
At the end of the visit

10. After the visit and evaluating outcomes
Administration
Classroom activities
Evaluation of the visit
Whole-school self-evaluation forms (SEFs)
Subject self-evaluation forms (SSEFs)

11. Work experience
Intended benefits of experiences
Evaluating experiences
Limitations on work placements
Arrangements to be made by school
Attendance register
Transport and meals
Workplace visits
Health and safety
Medical information
Reporting of accidents, incidents and dangerous occurrences
Child protection
Insurance
Additional insurance
Additional points for disabled students

12. Further information
Index

13. Templates

Additional information
Products specifications
Author A THOMAS, C STAGG, P SMITH
Pub Date 2009-04
Binding Book/Manual